Chickaloon Bay

We we're hoping to do a ski trip on the glaciers across Kachemak Bay, but a forecast for cloudy and rainy weather compelled us to do something where we thought that the weather would be nicer. Our plan was to walk the beach from Captain Cook State Park to Point Possession, cross the salt marsh at Chickaloon Bay and then packraft a short section of Turnagain Arm to Hope. During the car shuttle, we decided we didn't want to drive all the way to Hope, so we left a car at the Resurrection Pass trailhead near Cooper Landing. Our trip was about 100 miles and it took us four days and nights. We only packrafted a few miles, so it was fortunate that we bumped into our friend Joel in Hope. He took our packrafts and gave us a ride to the Resurrection Pass trailhead.

Cook Inlet at low tide from Captain Cook State Park

We started hiking at 7 PM around low slack tide (Nikiski +1.9 ft).

Recreational cabin balanced on a granite boulder. These boulders were transported from the Alaska Range by glaciers during the last ice age

Happy beachcombers

Beach camp near Birch Hill, about 12 miles up the beach from Captain Cook State Park

Beach fire

Moose Point

Set net cabin and driftwood net mending rack

Set net cabin

Point Possession, population 3. This isn't the real Point Possession, but a collection of set net cabins just southwest of the actual point

Point Possession. This is where Captain Cook placed a flag on June 1, 1778. Reportedly, the flag was never found. There's a cool story about this here

Chickaloon Bay. The bay is an expanse of mud flats, salt marsh and tidal guts. We saw lots of sand hill cranes, geese and bear sign. Travel was pretty easy when we found dry mud to walk on. We would sink into our ankles anytime we were walking on vegetation

Chickaloon River at low tide (Fire Island +0.1 ft)

Crossing the Chickaloon River with packrafts

Bushwhacking between Chickaloon Bay and the Enstar Pipeline road. Our route was not so good. We found better going in the black spruce where there was less dead downfall trees

Currant and fungal conks on a birch log

Tie beam and trunnel in the Big Indian Creek cabin

Bear tracks crossing a tidal gut near Burnt Island

 We walked the beach of Turnagain Arm for about a mile toward Hope while waiting for the tide to switch from ebb to flood. We launched the boats right at low slack tide (Fire Island -1.3 ft), which happened about one hour later than the predicted low tide at Fire Island

We walked the beach of Turnagain Arm for about a mile toward Hope while waiting for the tide to switch from ebb to flood. We launched the boats right at low slack tide (Fire Island -1.3 ft), which happened about one hour later than the predicted low tide at Fire Island

Packrafting up Turnagain Arm with the flood tide. The water was totally calm except for some eddies and wierd standing waves. Our dog was not calm

Turnagain Arm from Gull Rock, where we took out

It was great to bump into Joel at the Hope campground. He took our packrafts and gave us a ride to the Resurrection Pass trailhead

Bivouac between Pass and Fox Creek on the Resurrection Pass trail. We forgot that our paddle was our tent pole when we gave Joel our packrafts. It didn't matter because the weather was great

Resurrection Pass trail south of the Devils Pass trail. There was still about 2-3 feet of snow between the Devils Pass cabin and Resurrection Pass proper